Viva-voce examination – May 3, 15:00-16:00

On Thursday (May 3) at 15:00, Togzhan Kalamysheva will be defending her thesis in a viva-voce examination. The viva is public and all are welcome to attend.

Room 8.105, School of Humanities and Social Sciences

Title:
The Sociocultural Underpinnings of the Life Insurance Market in Kazakhstan

Abstract:
Life insurance is a financial tool used to provide for well-being of dependents in case of premature death or other risks that stop the income flow. The perception of life insurance differs across nations because of the differences in their social norms. This study is about Kazakhs’ perception of life insurance and the extent to which the idea of ensuring life is compatible with their norms and values. In the framework of this study, based on a large database of the life insurance company, I construct the profile of the Kazakhstani life insurance market and define consumption pattern across regions, the occupation of individuals, their age, gender and marital status. Further, I explain this consumption pattern by employing interviews with local people. I analyze my findings through concepts like risk-perception and death-perception that are central to the idea of ensuring life. As life insurance turns out to be incompatible with Kazakhs’ social norms, I explore local sales agents’ marketing strategies to overcome this cultural barrier.

Internal Advisers: Edwin Sayes & Zhanna Kapsalyamova
External Adviser: Prof. Bruno De Cordier, Ghent University

Viva-voce examination – May 3, 09:00-10:00

On Thursday (May 3) at 09.00, Di Wang will be defending her thesis in a viva-voce examination. The viva is public and all are welcome to attend.

Room 8.105, School of Humanities and Social Sciences

Title:
The Unofficial Russo-Qing Trade on the Eastern Kazakh Steppe and in Northern Xinjiang in the First Half of the 19th Century

Abstract:
The Treaty of Kuldja (Ili) signed in 1851 between the Russian empire and the Qing empire marked the start of the official Russo-Qing trade in Xinjiang. This thesis aims to explore the generally neglected pre-1851 unofficial Russo-Qing trade on the Eastern Kazakh steppe and in Northern Xinjiang by examining the trade in three area: Semipalatinsk, Tarbagatai and Ili. This pre-treaty era Russo-Qing trade was regarded as illegal on the Qing side with little information available, but legal on the Russian side with abundant data. By comparing the information in Chinese and Russian sources, this thesis argues that the original legal and official Kazakh-Qing trade established in the 1760s was gradually transformed into an unofficial Russo-Qing trade in the first half of the 19th century. Besides analyzing the motivation and the stance of the Russian empire and the Qing empire, this thesis highlights the role of individual actors such as merchants, nomads, government officials and border guards in forging the trade. This thesis also discusses the commodities in the trade, the myth of silver flow and the discovery of the dramatic price change in the year of 1840. The analysis of travelogues and quantitative archival data of the imports and exports of the Semipalatinsk custom post from the 1820s to the 1840s complement the existing scholarship on this topic. By discussing the above-mentioned themes, the author reaches the conclusion that the pre-Treaty era unofficial trade was already marked by established institutions and diverse commodities, though with a high degree of informality. The 1851 Treaty of Kuldja which officialized the Russo-Qing trade in Ili and Tarbagatai did not establish a new trade, but was a result of the pre-Treaty period unofficial trade and carried many characteristics of the pre-treaty era trade.

Internal Advisers: Nikolay Tsyrempilov & Clare Griffin

External Adviser: Prof. Erika Monahan, University of New Mexico

Eurasian MA First-Year Project Presentations – Thurs., Apr. 26, 14.00 – 17.00, 8.310

This Thursday (26th April) first-year students of the MA program in Eurasian Studies will be presenting their thesis feasibility studies in preparation for their research over the summer. The presentations are public. The full schedule is below:

14:00 -14:30 
Gauhar Baltabayeva 
International student migration from Kazakhstan to the US

Advisers: Caress Schenck & Saltanat Akhmetova

14:30 -15:00
Assem Kaliyeva

The waste management system in Astana: The social hierarchy and self-perception among the employees of waste management sector
Advisers: Zohra Ismail Beben & Paula Dupuy

15:00-15:30
Sandra Real
Narratives of Kumis Consumption and Production in Contemporary Kazakhstan

Advisers: Alima Bissenova & Christina Pugh
 
15:30-16:00
Merey Otan
Contemporary music in Kazakhstan and Youth identity

Advisers: Gabriel McGuire & Meiramgul Kussainova

16:00-16:30
Adel Kudaibergenova
Elderly Women in Kazakhstan: Ageing Experience and Popular Representations
Advisers: Sofiya An & Erika Alpert

16:30-17:00
Zhuldyz Tashmanbetova
The indigenous Christianity of Kazakh steppe: Adoption of Nestorian Christianity in Medieval Central Asia

Advisers: Daniel Scarborough & Paula Dupuy

Viva-voce examination – Apr 25, Weds.

On Wednesday 25th April at 16.00 Aigerim Kagarmanova will be defending her thesis in a viva-voce examination. The viva is public and all are welcome to attend.
Room 8.105, School of Humanities and Social Sciences

Title:
Electronic bazaar: Social Media as a Marketplace in Contemporary Kazakhstan photo_2017-10-25_16-25-57
Abstract:
This study focuses on different modalities of social media trade in Kazakhstan and how sellers create trust online using platform features, personal skills and physical locations of stores associated with social media accounts. Researching this topic in Kazakhstan locates this study in a specifically interesting intersection of trade, technology, informality and trust. Social media trade is a part of electronic commerce that is new and technologically advanced type of business, however many traders work informally as they fail to meet legal norms as business registration, paying taxes and giving receipts. Just as individual traders poured to the streets in the period of perestroika, modern day small business owners have occupied social media and turned it into an electronic bazaar. As shops located at bazaars transfer their stores online, and traders learn new technology in order to increase their sales, this study challenges the notion of bazaars being static and backward. Driven by the question of trust building in a complex realm of electronic but yet informal trade, I focus on a concept of a “living account” that is coined by my ethnographic data (interviews, observations and social media content analysis). I explore different dimensions of trade both online and offline to understand how these realms are intertwined in the question of informality and trust. I argue that the “aliveness” of an account produced through regular contact allows sellers to create trust that results in a successful sale. So, as long as an account is perceived to be “living” the question of formal registration, taxes and receipts is not relevant to customers.

Internal Advisers: Aziz Burkhanov & Erika Alpert

External Adviser: Prof. Paul Manning, Trent University

Congratulations to Xeniya!

We are delighted to announce that Xeniya Prilutskaya from the MA class of 2016 has been accepted onto the doctoral programme at the Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen with a Research Scholarship within the University’s Excellence Initiative, from October 2017 until September 2020.

Xeniya

Xeniya’s thesis topic will be ‘Perception of air pollution and ecological consciousness in Kazakhstan’, and she will be supervised by  Dr. Jeanne Féaux de la Croix.

Congratulations to Xeniya!

 

 

Viva-voce examination – Thurs 15th June

On Thursday 15th June at 17.45 Dmitriy Mel’nikov will be defending his thesis in a viva-voce examination.

The viva is public and all are welcome to attend.

Room 8.322B, School of Humanities and Social Sciences

Anuar Duisenbinov
Pavel Bannikov
A special edition of Novyi Mir dedicated to modern Kazakhstani Russophone writing.

Title: Toward Russophone Super-Literature: Making Subjectivities, Spaces And Temporalities In Post-Soviet Kazakhstani Russophone Writing

Abstract: This thesis is devoted to the analysis of literary works by a number of the leading post-Soviet Russophone Kazakhstani writers: Anuar Duisenbinov, Bakhyt Kairbekov, Diusenbek Nakipov, Nikolai Verёvochkin, Il’ia Odegov and Iurii Serebrianskii. Kazakhstan is a country where Russian literature has been developing quite successfully since the collapse of the USSR. There has been a transformation of writing in Russian in Kazakhstan since the country’s independence – with the rise of the new generation of the writers in the 2000s, Russian literature in Kazakhstan transformed into Russophone Kazakhstani literature. In this thesis, I argue for the difference between the younger and older generations of the contemporary Russophone Kazakhstani writers – the latter is focused on post-traumatic sense of loss and absence, while the former is characterized by a more positive identification concentrated on the new national post-independent realities of Kazakhstan. The concept of Russophone super-literature fits most the younger generation of the authors. The main argument of the thesis is that Russophone Kazakhstani literature is a supralinguistic and supracultural realm where complex subjectivities of Russophone Kazakh-ness, “other” Russian-ness and Kazakhstani-ness are produces and expressed. While increasing their community, the younger writers reconsider the imperial and colonial aspects of Russian-ness, incorporate (Russian-Kazakh) bilingualism, keep pace with literary modernity, accumulate their international literary capital and seek for independence from the political and nationalizing agendas of both Kazakhstan and Russia. Despite its growing importance, post-Soviet Russophone Kazakhstani literature is almost unexplored in English-language scholarship. While relying on textual analysis of prose and poetry as well as on in-depth interviews with the Kazakhstani writers, I conclude that now Russophone Kazakhstani literature demonstrates a high degree of vitality, first of all by nurturing new generations of Russophone writers in the Almaty Open Literary School; however, the bright possible future of the literature should not be overestimated, because of a number of problems such as poor national book market, the lack of audience and the continuing de-Russification of the country.

Internal Advisers: Victoria Thorstensson, Alima Bissenova & Gabriel McGuire

External Adviser: Prof Rossen Djagalov, New York University

 

 

Viva-voce examinations – Wed 10th May

On Wednesday 10th May from 15.00 two students from the MA in Eurasian Studies will be defending their theses in a viva-voce examination. The vivas are public and all are welcome to attend.

Room 8.322B, School of Humanities and Social Sciences

15.00 – 15.45 Saltanat Boteu

‘The Perception of Volunteering Experiences of Young Volunteers in Kazakhstan’

This thesis  focuses on volunteering as a modern phenomenon that has emerged after the collapse of the Soviet Union in Kazakhstan. The volunteering phenomenon has been neglected by social science research in Kazakhstan. Therefore, this study was undertaken to investigate the emergence of volunteering as a new unexplored social process. Particularly, I explore how perceptions of young volunteers form during their volunteering experience, that helps to understand the position of volunteer in Kazakhstani society. This thesis heavily relies on interviews with volunteers and key informants. In addition, I review the laws of Kazakhstan related to non-governmental and non-profit sector that indirectly touches upon volunteering and the recent Draft Law on volunteering (June 16, 2015). The thesis includes the opinions of experts, volunteers and government representatives on volunteers’ position and volunteering phenomenon in Kazakhstan. I explored the notion of volunteering in Kazakhstan, the opinions of participants on their motivations and the benefits from volunteering, the main issues that influence perception and motivation of volunteers in relationships with other actors (society, the state, volunteering organisation). The contribution of the study is the model of the relationships of volunteers with other actors, illustrating how the relationship between volunteers and the state, society and volunteering organisations are important for the volunteering sphere overall.

Internal advisers: Sofiya An & Zbigniew Wojnowski
External adviser: Professor Azamat Junisbai, Pitzer College

15.45 – 16.30 Aliya Tazhibayeva

‘The Internationalisation of Higher Education in Post-Soviet Kazakhstan: State Policies and Institutional Practices?’

This thesis deals with the interpretation and implementation of the internationalisation of higher education in Kazakhstan at national and institutional levels. The goal of the study is to find out how internationalisation of higher education is defined in the national policy documentation and in universities’ development strategies on education, how that interpretation is similar/different to those appearing in academic literature, and how it is reflected in the universities’ practices of internationalisation. As the research results illustrate, national and state higher education institutions in Kazakhstan are dependent on state policies in terms of internationalisation, though some freedom is given to universities in academic mobility and international cooperation, and limited by governmental funding for internationalisation activities. Kazakhstani universities plan and implement only the feasible elements of internationalisation, thus minimising the risk of failure.

Internal Advisers: Sofiya An & Jack Lee (GSE)

External Adviser: Professor Martha Merrill, Kent State University

Viva-voce examinations – 2nd May 2017

On Tuesday 2nd May from 16.00 three students from the MA in Eurasian Studies will be defending their theses in a viva-voce examination. The vivas are public and all are welcome to attend.

The Astana main bazaar, known as ‘Artem’.

Room 8.105

16.00 – 16.45 Darina Sadvakassova

‘Branding Kazakhstan: the Relationship between State and Non-state Actors.’

This thesis is devoted to the analysis of Kazakhstani nation branding processes. The Republic of Kazakhstan faced the need to present itself on international arena right after the country’s independence. The questions of nation branding were sidelined until the beginning of the 2000s, but they have recently received a new impetus. Academic literature on Kazakhstani nation branding tends to focus on separate advertising campaigns, thus failing to illustrate the whole mechanism of this phenomenon. In addition, it views nation branding as a top-down process, often overlooking the role of non-state actors. By focusing on tourism promotion as one element of the country’s nation branding, this research attempts to distinguish between state and non-state actors engaged in Kazakhstani nation branding and to examine how the relationship between those actors influences the national brand. Although it is difficult to draw clear differences between these sets of actors, in-depth interviews with representatives of the tourist board, tourist association, and travel agencies reveal the existence of a distinction between state and non-state actors as defined by nation branders themselves. Analysis of websites, printed, video, and audio materials helps to identify the images of Kazakhstan that are promoted on the international level, as well as to highlight particular elements of these images that are stressed by different sets of actors. Using a grounded theory approach, this study comes to the conclusion that the level of interaction between state and non-state actors has a strong influence on the content of the national brand.

Internal advisers: Aziz Burkhanov (GSPP) & Zbigniew Wojnowski
External adviser: Professor Sally Cummings, University of St Andrews

16.45 – 17.30 Meiirzhan Baitas

‘Traders of the Central Bazaar in Astana: a perspective on motives and social networks.’

This MA thesis focuses on the Central Bazaar traders in Astana that were recruited via convenience sampling. The goal of the research is to investigate the reasons for becoming a trader, identifying factors that lead to the decision to become a trader, and the role of social networks in traders’ lives. In this paper I employ the bottom-up approach to research informal markets as opposed to macro perspective and thus I focus life stories of traders. The research fills the gap in the literature of informal markets by addressing the relationship between one’s motives and social networks in trade. I find that traders’ motives have decisive effects on the establishment of social networks and on the evolution of social networks over time as well as on traders’ perceptions of success and failure. On the one hand I found that highly extrinsically driven traders are better off by establishing strong social networks, which often times evolve into unconditional social networks. This is due to the fact that strong social networks provide traders with the feeling of security and stability. Strong social networks over time, however, become less complex and turn into two-dimensional connections. On the other hand, highly intrinsically driven traders often times fail to establish meaningful social networks due to an individualistic approach to trade and no desire to cooperate and commit to networks.

Internal advisers: John Schoeberlein & Alima Bissenova
External adviser: Professor Hasan Karrar, Lahore University of Management Sciences

17.30 – 18.15 Gulnar Akanova

​’​L​anguage Ideologies of Kazakhstani youth: the Value of Kazakh in the Context of a Changing Linguistic Marketplace.’

The issue of the statuses and use of Kazakh and Russian languages has been a topic of disputes and discussions on both public and private levels since Kazakhstan obtained its independence. During the years when Kazakhstan was a part of the Soviet Union the Soviet authorities deliberately promoted Russian language and culture and displaced the local language from public domains. As a result, Russian language acquired an important place in everyday lives of the people and was a lingua franca for the population. Thus, Russian was perceived as a prestigious language whereas Kazakh lost its value.​ ​There have now been 25 years of ​the ​promotion of Kazakh language. The population of Kazakhstan reports having positive attitude to Kazakh language and the number of children studying in Kazakh-medium schools increased during the years of independence from about a million people in 1991 to approximately 1.57 million in 2011 (Altynbekova, 2011; Fierman, 2006). However, ​d​espite the authority of Kazakh as an authentic language Russian is the dominant language in many domains.This thesis focuses on the language ideologies of contemporary Kazakhstani young people based on fieldwork conducted in the new capital city of Astana. The Kazakhstani younger generation has complex language ideologies regarding the value of Kazakh, Russian, and English which affect young people’s use of languages in different contexts. Russian is not likely to lose its value in the near future, while the current trends promise an increase in popular support for the use of Kazakh.

Internal advisers: John Schoeberlein, Erika Alpert & Mahire Yakup
​External Adviser: Professor Laada Bilaniuk, University of Washington, Seattle.

First year MA Project Presentations

On Monday 24th April first-year students on the MA in Eurasian Studies will be presenting their thesis feasibility studies in preparation for their research over the summer. The presentations are public, and the students are anxious for feedback and comments, so do please attend if you’re interested. The full schedule is below:

Monday 24th April Room 8.322B 10.00 – 13.20

10.00 – 10.20 Aigerim Kagarmanova: Electronic bazaar: Social Media as a marketplace in contemporary Kazakhstan

The phenomenon of shuttle trade emerged after the collapse of the Soviet Union. Sellers with professional qualifications started trading in bazaars and shopping centers to sustain their families and survive during the economic transition period. This study looks at contemporary small business representatives that trade on Social Media in order to explore the way bazaars have extended to the digital world and became a part of electronic commerce in Kazakhstan.

10.20 – 10.40 Xeniya Udod: A Choir of Soloists: Agendas and Controversies of Contemporary Feminism in Kazakhstan

My paper investigates a recent revival of feminism in Kazakhstan where several feminist unions as well as numerous individual activists promote feminist ideas, as well as advocating gender equality and LGBT rights. In a country with a mixed legacy of public and private patriarchy, such activity faces challenges, and or even dangerous responses towards the public display of feminism and/or non-heterosexual sexuality. By founding this paper upon academic sources from Eastern European countries as well as Soviet and post-Soviet Russia and other Central Asian republics, as well as by conducting in-depth interviews with the country’s outspoken feminist activists, I seek to define their concepts of thecontemporary Kazakhstani feminist agenda and its basic principles.

10.40 – 11.00 Di Wang: Tarbagatai and Ili: Trade and Merchant Networks in northern Xinjiang in the 18th and 19th century.

The research focuses on the political context that enabled trade in Tarbagatai and Ili in northern Xinjiang starting from the mid-18th century and lasting till the end of 19th century. It also addresses the role of merchant networks and commodities.

11.00 – 11.20 Nurgul Zhanabayeva: The Changing Perceptions and Practices of Nonmarital Relationships among Ethnic Kyrgyz Youth in Bishkek

The proposed study aims to investigate the patterns of nonmarital relationships among young never-married heterosexual men and women in Kyrgyzstan, Bishkek. I am particularly interested in how young people understand and interpret “romantic relationships” within their cultural settings, as well as their intentions and aspirations when establishing a nonmarital relationship that might involve emotional and/or physical intimacy.

11.20 – 11.40 Zhansaule Kimel: Small town capitalism: socio-economic implications of women’s involvement in trade

I am going to explore the involvement of the population in the informal sector of the economy in a small town of southern Kazakhstan. I am also going to focus on how and why women play a greater role in maintaining the economic development of the city through trade, which is one of the key income sources of the city population.

11.40 – 12.00 David Hansen: Bones of the Bronze Age: A bioarchaeological study of micro-regional interaction in south-east Kazakhstan

This study examines the evidence for health and disease among the individuals from an archaeological site in southeast Kazakhstan by drawing on osteological assessment of skeletal remains from the site. The research will address questions on ancient identity, ritual systems, and economy among prehistoric pastoralist populations of Central Asia, and investigate the individual against the backdrop of Bronze Age regional interactions

12.00 – 12.20 Merey Seitova: The changes adults with physical disabilities experienced in health care due to the transition from the Soviet Union to independent Kazakhstan

The research will focus on how health care changed for adults with disabilities because of the transition from communist Soviet Union to sovereign Kazakhstan. The research will include conducting qualitative interviews in Astana with adults with physical disabilities of different sex, and age above 30 years. The participants will be recruited by method of snowball sampling. The home for adults with disabilities in Astana will be also visited for observation and participants’ recruitment.

12.20 – 12.40 Karina Matkarimova: German “Soft Power” Strategy in Kazakhstan: Educational and Cultural Aspects.

The research is dedicated to the analysis of German “soft power” strategy in Kazakhstan, with particular focus on education and culture spheres. The aim of the research is to understand features of German “soft power” strategy, the role of the German diaspora in “soft power” strategy and to indicate the main actors engaged in this process.

12.40 – 13.00 Dina Mukatova: Nuclear culture and Nuclear legacies in Kazakhstan and Japan

In my research I am going to focus on Kazakhstan and Japan, countries that directly suffered from the nuclear weapons. The emergence of nuclear culture became a significant step in the comprehension of nuclear energy use. It is a set of perceptions that people have in order to deal with the consequences of the nuclear legacy, whether they suffered directly from nuclear testing, or they lived in the constant fear of irreparable damage from nuclear fallout. There is a lack of scholarship dedicated to Kazakhstani nuclear culture. However, Japanese culture abounds with the works related to the nuclear legacy. I want to compare the Kazakhstani and Japanese experiences of dealing with the consequences of nuclear use.

13.00 – 13.20 Togzhan Kalamysheva: The socio-cultural underpinnings of the life insurance market Kazakhstan.

This study analyzes the life insurance demand in Kazakhstan through the prism of the cultural and social norms of Kazakhs. It will examine the socio-cultural response of Kazakhs to the idea of life insurance. As well, it aims to investigate the influence of the current economic situation and socio-demographic factors on the life insurance consumption.